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Wedding Invitations 101 - Ideas & Planning Tips


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No invitation is harder to do than the wedding invitations. There is an etiquette involved when it comes to the wording – so many ways to say the one thing that can cause a tension headache or two. There is the design, do you organise pre-designed and pre-printed invitations or do you shuffle the schedule around to make your own? Wedding invitations are usually sent out to guests six to eight months out from the wedding date, and the RSVP’s will need to be back in to you or to a delegated guest list organiser at least one month out from the wedding (so you can finalise catering and seating arrangements).  Oh and I forgot to mention “Who” to invite – concerns children and “Plus One” invitations.

Please don’t start stressing or packing your bags to elope!  So you know your invitations have to be made up and ready to go out in the mail eight months before your wedding, six months out from the date minimum and RSVP’s need to be back to you a month out from the date. If you have a family member or friend who can take on the task of chasing up outstanding RSVP’s that will help calm your nerves. But, back to the start:

Design/Concept: What would you like? Do you have a certain theme, colour palette? Are you going to order pre-made invitations and have the details printed on them (Pink Frosting can do this for you with a variety of styles, colours, themes available). Simply choose your favourite invitation, include the details such as names, date, time, location and sit back and wait for them to arrive. It is best to do this as soon as possible, don’t leave it to the last minute even though you don’t have to do anything more than just a click of the mouse.

If you are going to make your own invitations, make sure you have people who can help you put them together. I made my wedding invitations up and rounded up my mum and future brother-in-law to help me put them together. DIY is a little more time consuming and because you are making them you have to hunt through art and craft shops to find the perfect pieces of cards and papers to suit your wedding theme and colour palette. This may take a few expeditions as I found out. I would buy a selection of cards and paper with embellishments and then make mock-up invitations. By my eighth trip to the craft store I ended up bringing my mum and she helped me choose the colours, cards, papers, envelopes and ribbons (she made over 60 gold ribbon roses to stick on each invitation).  Have a play around with the material, don’t stress out if it isn’t working immediately, it is just the mock-up of your concept.

Making your own invitations you will need to allocate more time to allow for the initial trials and then once you have your invitation then you have to have the papers printed, cards cut out and a team to help you put all the pieces together. This can also be a great way to bond with your helpers – let them know how much you appreciate their help.

Wording:

When it comes to wording of your invitations there are so many options. Pre-designed invitations are already printed, all you have to do is select the one you like and add your personal details to it. If you are making your own, or using ready-made invitations that are left blank for you to include your own wording a search on-line can help you find your words or template.  Traditional wording of the wedding invitation includes no capital letters for each line, names and titles however are to have proper capitalisation. Date and time are to be written in full e.g.: “May, 29th Two thousand and twelve at half past two in the afternoon”. Remember to include the appropriate dress code. For more ideas on how to word your invitation have a look at Pink Frosting’s guide to invitations.

Children and “Plus One”: If children are invited then you can include their names (if you know them) on the invitation or address it to the parents and include “plus children”. If you do not want children attending your wedding you can advise this on the invitation or to avoid any upset or confusion talk to the parents before you send out the invites just explaining that it is a child-free wedding. Allow them time to organise babysitters and be prepared for some guests not being able to attend without their children. BUT if you cover this issue early and politely I am sure the parents will understand, after all it is your wedding. Most parents may jump at the chance to have a sitter and enjoy some grown up time at your wedding.

Another thing you may need to consider is the age of the children. If you are having a child-free wedding would you make an exception for a guest who has a baby? The other issue is the “Plus One”. If you are inviting a family member or friend and you know they are single/in a relationship but it is dating level only, would you extend to them the opportunity to bring a guest? If you are happy to have them bring a date then next to their name on the invitation write “Plus One”. If not, then it is just their name on the invitation and the RSVP card to reflect it as only their attendance. 

Overall, when you start considering your invitations, Pink Frosting are on hand to help you whether you want to organise ready-made invitations or are going to be making your invitations, you can source all your decorations, products and ideas from Australia’s #1 Wedding & Party Shop. Easy!



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