Pink Frosting - Australia's #1 Party & Wedding ShopAustralia's #1 Party & Wedding Shop
CHECKOUT 0 Items  $0.00
... loading ...

Australia's BIGGEST Weddings & Party Sale STARTS NOW! Hurry, while stock lasts! >Shop Now

60%


A Traditional Christmas


traditionalchristmastreesettingwithfireplace.jpg

Everyone, every family have their own traditions for Christmas. For me as a kid, my brothers and I would have to have our rooms clean; beds made, showered, fed and have cups of coffee to take in to mum and dad to wake them up. From there we would then go and perch around the Christmas tree and wait for them to have their coffee and get ready. After what would feel like us passing Christmas and on the verge of New Year’s Day, our parents would appear and Dad would then hand out the presents and my brothers and I would have wrapping paper from one end of the house to the other in record time. My parents would then go and fix our Christmas lunch and then the rest of the day was spent eating and playing board games together until the food-induced coma would knock us all out. J Now I am a mum, Mike and I are finding our feet and with each year we add or adjust our Christmas traditions, but we are making them our own. The Christmas tree makes its debut on the 1st December. We read them stories about the Birth of Jesus and on Christmas Eve watch National Lampoons Christmas Vacation, Elf, Christmas Story (where the main character, a little boy obsesses about getting his hands on a Red Rider BB Gun for Christmas) and the old stop-motion animated Christmas classics.

There are so many different traditions. Bethlehem, the birthplace of Jesus Christ sees its people visit the Church of the Nativity and watch the procession. Made up of the police, government and church officials, a horseman who bears a cross and rides upon a coal-black steed, they enter the church and place an effigy of the Holy Child within the church. A silver star is said to mark the birthplace of Jesus.  China celebrates the New Year and it is the Spring Festival where children receive gifts of new clothes and toys and they have fire cracker displays. It is a time where they celebrate and honour their ancestors. In Greece, gifts are given on the 1st of January – Saint Basil’s Day. All water containers in the house are emptied and filled with St Basil’s water. Instead of Christmas trees the Greeks have a wooden cross that is wrapped with Basil and suspended in a small bowl of water. Every day a family member takes the cross and dips it in the water and then sprinkles it in each room to keep the unkind spirits at bay.

On Christmas Day in Iraq, the Christians gather at church where the priest holds a service. At the end of it, he then blesses a person with a touch. This person then touches the person next to them and they pass it on. It is called the “Touch of Peace”. How beautiful is that? In Poland the Christmas feast begins upon the appearance of the first star on Christmas Eve (the star of Bethlehem). They then set about a 12-course feast which is to represent the twelve apostles and a spare seat is set to accommodate an arrival of a stranger or the Holy Spirit! Indian Christians decorate banana and mango trees, adorning their homes with leaves from mango trees and placing clay oil lamps on the corners of their roof.

Sweden, the eldest daughters wear white gowns with a red sash and on their heads an evergreen wreath with seven lit candles. They go around to each family member giving them food the way Saint Lucia went in to the tunnels to give food to the Christians who were forced to hide from persecution. The Germans really know how to have fun. Their legends tell of the rivers turning to wine, animals start talking and fruit is abundant and mountains give up their treasured gems. Don’t get too caught up in the merriment though, if you happen to sleep in on the morning of the 21st December, Saint Thomas’ Day then you will be the butt of everyone’s jokes. For the day you will be known as Thomas Donkey and will have to tote a cardboard donkey around. Don’t stress out about it too much though. Once they are done mocking you, you all get to enjoy Thomasplitzchen aka a yummy iced currant buns (ooops! Close typo there I almost put “m” at the end of “bu”!) My brother sleeps in every morning. Maybe we will start calling him Thomas Donkey – any excuse to have an iced currant bun with my cup of tea sounds great!

My favourite would have to be Venezuela. Between the 16th and 24th December early morning mass, called Misa de Aguinaldo is held daily. Now apparently it is customary to roller skate to these services. Yes, that’s right - roller skate. I LOVE roller skating! As they skate through the town to church, they go by windows and tug on pieces of string that are hanging out. These pieces of string are tied to the toes of the sleeping children. Hmmm…my kids don’t know the concept of sleeping in and for friends of ours, they’d need more than a piece of string to get their kids out of bed, things like marching bands, cyclones or a bomb going off.

As I learn about the traditions of other countries, maybe we might include a few for our own. I am definitely all for the roller skating, iced currant buns and calling my brother a donkey, but also find the Touch of Peace a beautiful and in this day and age meaningful tradition that is shared around the world when we reach out and hug our loved ones on Christmas Day and isn’t that what Christmas is about? Spreading peace, love and goodwill to all mankind?



Wedding Ideas &
Party Planning

...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Sign up for the Pink Frosting newsletter for the latest product arrivals, inspiring ideas for your events and sale alerts.